Career services is central to #admissions and #recruitment success. #emchat

As a chief admissions officer, I am convinced that the strength of career services and the programs a college offers to prepare students for life after college are more important than ever for those responsible for recruitment. Admissions officers must be equipped with the strongest-possible case for their career services, if they are going to be able to persuade increasingly skeptical students and parents.

I am really proud of what we are doing at Augustana College and feel like I am better equipped than ever before to illustrate how we do things better than others. I love our approach for the value it will have to our students and future graduates. And, as an admissions officer, I am thrilled to be able to highlight what we are doing through CORE.

This fall we launched CORE, which is outlined in detail below.

core_banner

CORE is more than collection of offices and services, which many colleges have. It’s more than an acronym for Careers, Opportunities, Research and Exploration. CORE is a campus-wide re-orientation to the student experience, with a primary focus to ensure students connect experiences, information, knowledge, passions and ambitions—all with the objective of understanding and reaching their goals for success. CORE’s approach is to sit side-by-side with Augustana students throughout their four years, and guide them—in partnership with their advisor—to make sure they are ready and equipped to achieve their goals. This approach to a residential liberal arts college education is something new.

CORE—The approach 

CORE’s approach is research-driven, emphasizing the experiences that have proven most effective in preparing students to be successful. It also represents a shift in how a college can prepare students to take ownership of their career path by planning ahead and making strategic connections between in- and out-of-classroom learning. The approach of meeting students in the moment enables CORE staff to equip them with the resources and opportunities to customize their education, maximize their success, and make the necessary connections that lead to meaningful learning experiences.

CORE—The place 

Like the Tredway Library and the Center for Student Life, CORE is a hub in the center of Augustana’s campus. The centralization and integration of CORE services send an important message about our campus community, and make it easier to stop in throughout the week.

CORE—The services 

Primary services and staff are in offices and services related to advising, career development, community outreach, internships, student research, study away and vocational exploration.

CORE—The differences 

Viking Score—A proactive, practical way for students to ensure they are on the path to reach their post-graduate goals

Staffing levels—An increase from four career counselors to 13 professionals

Advising and vocational exploration—Advising on first-year experience, choice of academic fields, identification of skills and talents, internship and research opportunities, career and graduate school preparation, and more

Augie Choice—$2,000 for each student to fund an internship, research experience or study abroad

Research and other projects to solve community problems—Community service, Entrepreneurship (EDGE) Center projects, and internships through the Upper Mississippi Center

Faculty-led international study—We have a long history of our faculty developing and leading international study programs at Augustana. We don’t outsource our international programs to other schools, but maintain the values of Augustana by having our faculty work with students on and off campus.

CORE—The worth 

CORE prepares Augustana College graduates to navigate a challenging future and complex job market with versatility, generosity and skill. In doing so, CORE positions Augustana as one of the nation’s leaders in advancing the benefits of a liberal arts education on a residential campus.

As an admissions professional, I know that more than ever before my message must focus on this aspect of the college experience and I need to be armed with a persuasive case. I believe that CORE has equipped me with that.

How are you approaching this new frontier? Has career services and programming associated with preparing students for success taken on new life for you? What do you think of the CORE approach?

W. Kent Barnds @bowtieadmission

Some thoughts about leading #admissions teams #emchat

Last week a colleague returned a book I’d loaned out a few years ago. The book, “The art of worldly wisdom,” by Baltasar Gracian, was a gift to me and I’ve found comfort and guidance in it throughout my career. Since I’d not seen the book for some time I took a few minutes to leaf through it and came across a folded piece of paper titled “Advice from Kent Barnds.”

The sheet of paper was yellowed and had clearly been folded in the pages of this book for some time. To be honest, I’d forgotten about this collection of thoughts about becoming a leader. However, as I re-read this collection of thoughts and suggestions, I thought it might be worth sharing here.

I can’t claim these thoughts as original and credit many others who have helped shape this advice through the years.

Here’s what I’d written years ago:

Advice from Kent Barnds about becoming a leader

Work/Life Balance

Book a vacation on your calendar so you have something to look forward to and work towards.

Staff Morale

Host a traditional/annual team gathering, i.e. Christmas party, July 4, Flag Day.

Involvement Avoids the Perception of Power

Continue to participate in tactics like interviews, fall travel, information session, etc.

Communicate openly when working on non-team items

Send regular email updates to staff on items that don’t necessarily involve them. Doing so prevents gossip and rumbles about you not being involved.

We all have roles to play

As a leader your loyalties are divided among your employer, your team and the students you serve. Think of it all like a jazz quintet. Everyone takes turns playing a solo, sitting in the background or playing together. You will get recognized at the appropriate time just like the bassist does.

Acknowledge/Praise Good Work Privately

Beware of praising individuals in front of groups. Send an email, note or stop into the office of the individual to offer praise.

Be forward-thinking

One, generally, needs one full cycle to become an effective leader; appreciate that and be patient. Also, know your optimal daily work cycle; what times are best for you to get done what you need to get done. Don’t get behind.

I don’t know if this advice has any value to others, but I am glad I ran across this document because it reminded me of a number of things I need to work on and I continue to develop as a leader. As hard as I’ve tried to live up to this advice, I know there are areas that require constant work and improvement.

I think it’s still relevant to me and I hope others out there who are in leadership positions.

What would you add?

Kent Barnds aka @bowtieadmissions

Wanted Experienced Enrollment Professional: The world is your oyster! #admissions #emchat

Wanted Experienced Enrollment Professional: The world is your oyster!

Earlier this week I received an email from Witt-Kieffer, a higher leaderships search firm, that congratulated people who recently landed new enrollment leadership roles. It was an impressive list of people—some of whom I know and some I don’t. I wish each new leader well as they transition and take over the reigns of leadership and their new institution; we certainly face interesting times in enrollment leadership and I welcome new energy, perspective and ideas.

In addition to the congratulations offered to a couple of dozen people who have landed new gigs, there was another interesting list of openings for which Witt-Kieffer is seeking leadership.

That list is below and includes some very high profile positions as you’ll see below:

  • Boston College, Vice Provost for Enrollment Management
  • College of William and Mary, Associate Provost for Enrollment and Dean of Admission
  • Dickinson College, Vice President for Enrollment, Marketing and Communications
  • New Jersey Institute of Technology, Associate Vice President for Academic and Enrollment Services
  • Olin College of Engineering, Dean of Admission and Financial Aid
  • Portland State University, Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Affairs
  • Rutgers University – Camden, Associate Chancellor for Enrollment Management
  • Trinity College, Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid
  • University at Buffalo, Director of Undergraduate Admissions
  • University of California, Los Angeles, Deputy Director of Undergraduate Admission
  • University of Texas at Austin, Vice Provost for Enrollment Management
  • Washington and Lee University, Vice President for Admissions and Financial Aid

Looking at that list, the impressive titles and range of places where positions are available, I am led to believe that experienced enrollment professionals have a lot of options if they are thinking about changing positions!

Honestly, I don’t know what to make of this.  I know there is a great deal of turnover and churn of leadership in our profession right now and am withholding judgment to determine if this churn is good or bad. Is this good? Is this unusual? Is this a sign of time? How should I interpret all of this?

The one take-away from this list is:  If you are an ambitious, experienced enrollment leader, the world is your oyster! That is, if you are ready for a new challenge and secure enough to leave your current post.

What do you think about the turnover in leadership?

W. Kent Barnds @bowtieadmission

 

Teaching, preaching and competing: What I love about college #admissions

I’ve been lazy about contributing to my blog in recent months and thought my return to @bowtieadmission should be a tribute to college admission.

So, here it goes. I love college admissions work because, as professionals, we get to teach, preach and compete and I think that’s a pretty powerful combination for a fulfilling career.

I am a teacher (and so are you)

I know there’s some danger describing what we do in college admissions as teaching in an environment that has a pretty clear definition of who teaches and who does not. But, after more than twenty years in college admissions work, I consider myself and my colleagues to be teachers. Not only are we teachers—we are excellent teachers. We teach, generally, about a critically important process—the college search and selection process. The curriculum changes from year to year as processes, the environment and the competitive landscape shifts. We have to keep on top of the changes and have an obligation to keep our teaching fresh in order to serve our students effectively.

We also engage in a great deal of one-on-one teaching through the sort of advising we do. I can think of no more rewarding teaching than those intimate conversations with prospective students as they navigate the most important decision they’ll make up to this point in their life. All of those interviews, phone calls, one-on-one conversations and opportunities to advise prospective students is the teaching we do as admissions officers and it is tremendously rewarding.

Oh, and, we also do a little bit of grading, just like teachers, during the selection process; that’s a pretty important parts of what we do.

For those admissions officers, like me, who are in leadership roles, we engage in different sort of teaching through training new staff in the profession, the ethics of our work and the Xs and Os of the day-to-day work in the office. This is critically important teaching for our institutions and for the profession as a whole and it is this teaching role that keeps me excited about this great profession.

The bottom-line is that if you don’t think of yourself as a teacher, you should.

Preach it like you mean it

These days the word passion is overused. However, the most effective admissions officers talk about the institution they represent like they are spreading the gospel. They are passionate about the subject, institution, people, place and product. Admissions officers are evangelists for the type of institutions they represent, as well as the individual institution. I’ve witnessed countless information sessions, college night conversations, and one-on-one exchanges that resemble a member of the clergy or layperson in the pulpit engaged in sharing an important, impassioned message or lesson. The most effective admissions officers get behind their institution and the type of institution they represent in the same way a preacher gets behind sharing the gospel. To be successful, long-term, in this work, one has to get fired up about the people and place and spread the good news by preaching it high and low, on- and off-line and with the passion of an evangelist.

For me, as a product of a residential liberal arts college and having witnessed the transformative value of similar colleges for which I’ve worked, I look forward to preaching the good word each and every day.

Competition is good

While we all like to say, “we want every college to be successful,” the truth is that the best admissions counselors like to compete and are very competitive by their nature. In my view, the refrain competition is good is like Gordon Gecko’s, “Greed is good.” Not everyone will embrace this part of the work, but the fact is competition is an important part of this work. One’s competitive nature may be more internally-driven and might manifest itself with an overwhelming need to continually improve. However, there are plenty of great admissions people who I know who compete hard and may approach things differently. There are some for whom it is important to identify a competitor against whom it’s important to always win.

Competition and competing is what makes this job fun and fresh. Competing for mind-share, market, applications and enrollments is tremendously rewarding. Competing is not for the faint of heart and one has to have a tough stomach. But, engaging in goal-driven work and knowing that others (especially at tuition-driven and enrollment-urgent colleges) depend on you and the work you do is fulfilling and is among the many things that keeps me excited about this job and profession.

What do you love about college admissions?

And, do you consider yourself a teacher, preacher and competitor?

W. Kent Barnds @bowtieadmission

Getting inside the head of a 17-year-old. #admissions #emchat #highered

This post also appeared in the Augustana College publication, Acknowledge. 

In admissions, we often describe our work as “trying to get inside the head of a 17-year-old.” However, when I began in 1992, I couldn’t have foreseen a day like today and a resource like Facebook, which really does allow us to get inside the thoughts of students thinking about Augustana.

When our admissions office experimented with the launch of a Class of 2015 Facebook page, we saw modest participation. Since those early efforts we’ve expanded the pages to include parents, and now see robust and enthusiastic participation. Patterns among deciding and committed students provide insight into what’s on their minds, and almost in real time.

Through our review of questions asked on the Class of 2016 page, we were able to tailor communication to more effectively address questions at the right times. In response to questions about housing selection and parking, we launched a very successful series of videos featuring Gus, our mascot, on the Class of 2017 page. And based on the questions last year, we’ll expand the videos for the Class of 2018 to better serve our students during the transition.

While surveying comments on the Class Facebook pages has certainly helped us communicate better with students, the real benefit is to witness in real time the enthusiasm students have for Augustana. It is through these posts that many of our future students stake their preliminary claim in the Augustana experience. In the past few days, I’ve read of the dreams of veterinarians, speech pathologists, accountants, political scientists, teachers, neuroscientists and aspiring Ph.Ds.

I’ve read of a student looking for roommates in search of a “coherent color scheme.” There are enthusiastic posts about the LGBT community on campus. There are all-state tuba players, bassoonists and a student insistent upon starting a club marching band! Student-athletes in all of our 23 programs post about their excitement to be a Viking.

The posts reveal aspirations of leadership in and outside the classroom, desire to build community, find a roommate and be a part of something big. Facebook provides us with a way to literally read the thoughts of the students seriously considering Augustana, in a way we never could have imagined 20 years ago.

W. Kent Barnds a.k.a. @bowtieadmission

Pick up the phone… please! #emchat #admissions #highered

Maybe I am “old school,” but I still believe a telephone call is one of the most important communication methods for college admissions counselors. The give and take—relaying and gathering information—is unmatched and frequently mutually beneficial. However, it’s harder and harder to get students and parents to pick up the phone.

While this is not always the case and there are certainly surprising instances when people do answer (i.e. in a public restroom, at concerts, in class or at work), it’s become increasingly difficult to reach people by phone.

I get it. We have the technology and the inclination to screen calls.

I am guilty of it. I screen my calls at home. I have sympathy for families who are bombarded with calls—wanted and unwanted. I filter calls and answer only those from organizations or people I know or from whom I want to hear. Caller ID serves as my gate-keeper and enables me to spend time talking to the people and organizations that I want to talk to, while ignoring others.

I suspect this is the same behavior for students and parents who are overwhelmed with phone calls. But, to be honest, I am not sure that’s the case. I wish I could be certain.

Are students and families just too busy to take calls?

Is it just not the right time to answer a call?

Are our calls being ignored because of lack of interest?

Are students and families too timid to “break up” with us?

I suppose many families might wonder why we are calling? And that a good question. I like to think we are calling to relay or gather important information, rather than bug, harass or bother students. When we make a call or schedule a call it is usually with a clear purpose in mind.

For example, right now, we are making three very specific types of calls: 1. To inform a student that an element of his or her application is missing and we need it to complete a review and offer an admissions decision; 2. To determine if a student remains interested in Augustana; and, 3. To discuss the detail of their financial aid award letter and make sure the student and family understands every detail of the award they’ve received.

Each of these calls is designed to serve our students and provide timely decisions and communicate thoroughly. However, we can’t serve students and families in this way if they don’t answer the phone.

I plead with students to pick up the phone, especially this time of year. Pick up the phone and provide feedback—tell those colleges you are still interested in that you remain interested, and break up with the rest. Pick up the phone and communicate with us, even if it is to take the 20 seconds to say, “I am no longer interested in your college.” Don’t leave us trying to figure out if you are interested and playing hard to get, or if you’ve moved on.

I also plead with parents and partners—guidance and independent counselors—to join me in this plea to help stop the unnecessary calls and serve all of our interested students and families more effectively by eliminating the guesswork about who’s in and who’s out.

When the phone rings and it’s from a college, just think of it as a question—and answer it. 

W. Kent Barnds a.k.a. @bowtieadmission

Looking at the competition: A comparison of Net Price Calculators from student’s view. #admissions #emchat #highered #financialaid

Since the federally mandated introduction of the net price calculator (NPC) in October of 2011, I’ve been curious to know what kinds of results students would get if they completed our calculator and those from some of our competitors.

I’ve been curious to know if the NPC results in a clearer “apples to apples” comparison of cost.

I’ve been curious to see how other colleges present information to students.

I’ve been curious to better understand the impressions about affordability and value with which a student might be left after completing ours and a competitor’s.

I’ve been curious to know how we stack up against flagship universities and other private colleges.

Lots of curiosity on my part, but no action…until now.

Over the recent holiday break, I asked one of our student ambassadors, assisted by the Office of Institutional Research and Assessment, to undertake a project to complete our net price calculator and NPCs from some of our top competitors. To initiate the project, I developed an archetype academic profile and worked with the Office of Financial Assistance to develop four different financial backgrounds to use in our experiment (these profiles are listed below). After developing the profiles for our students, we developed a list of competitor schools based on data from the National Clearinghouse and those schools with which we overlap most frequently.

My initial list included 10 colleges (Bradley University, DePaul University, Elmhurst College, University of Iowa, Illinois Wesleyan University, Loyola University, Marquette University, North Central College, Northern Illinois University, and University of Illinois–Champaign-Urbana). When I asked my colleagues in Institutional Research and Assessment to look at my initial findings, they thought it would be good to add Gustavus Adolphus College (peer), Loras College (regional competition), Luther College (peer), Monmouth College (regional competition) and Northwestern University (competition for highest-achieving students).

 

Academic Profile

ACT: 25; Class Rank: top 20%;

and, G.P.A. 3.2

Student 1: $75,000 household income, family of 3, 1 in college, assets $5,000

Parents’ marital status: Married

State of residence: CO

Family size: 3

Number in college: 1

Parents’ income: $69,662

Parents’ income taxes paid: $4,376

Parent 1 income earned: $56,800

Parent 2 does not work

Parents’ untaxed income: $5,000

Parents’ assets: $5,000

Student income: $2,850

Student income taxes paid: $0

Student untaxed income: $0

Student assets: 160

 

Student 2: $120,000 household income, family of 4, 1 in college, assets $10,000

Parents’ marital status: Married

State of Residence: IL

Family size: 4

Number in college: 1 

Parents’ income: $108,084

Parents’ income taxes paid: $10,041

Parent 1 income earned: $89,792

Parent 2 income earned: $7,154

Parents’ untaxed income: $9,855

Parents’ assets: $10,000

Student income: 1,340

Student income taxes paid: $0

Student untaxed income: $0

Student assets: $2,300

 

Student 3: $200,000 household income, family of 5, 2 in college, assets $20,000

Parents’ marital status: Married

State of Residence: IL

Family size: 5

Number in college: 2 

Parents’ income: $179,670

Parents’ income taxes paid: $23,676

Parent 1 income earned: $175,480

Parent 2 does not work

Parents’ untaxed income: $17,000

Parents’ assets: $20,000

Student income: $3,000

Student income taxes paid: $0

Student untaxed income: $0

Student assets: $8,000

 

Student 4: $45,000 household income, family of 4, 1 in college, assets $0

Parents’ marital status: Divorced/Single

State of Residence: IL

Family size: 4

Number in college: 1 

Parents’ income: $46,230

Parents’ income taxes paid: $183

Parents’ income earned: $47,900

Parents’ untaxed income: $0

Parents’ assets: $0

Student income: $1,000

Student income taxes paid: $0

Student untaxed income: $0

Student assets: $200 

* We also made the oldest parent 55, since it was a question asked by a couple of institutions.

 

So, what did we find?

Before I get to the results, and try to make some sense of it all, I thought the following observations might be of interest.

It will cost you nothing to attend: A couple of the college’s NPCs include the Parent PLUS loan in calculating the out-of-pocket cost for students. This is an interesting technique. The “estimated net price” is clearly outlined, but when the PLUS loan is included under the guise of “eligibility for other aid programs” it can make the out-of-pocket cost appear to be $0.

Indirect costs are wildly different: Indirect costs, which include things like books, personal expenses, and transportation, are considered in calculating the amount of financial need a family has, and therefore indirect costs have a direct relationship to demonstrated financial need. What I found surprising is the dramatic range in indirect costs, which varied on the high end from $4,600 (regional public) to the low end of $2,400 (private, national liberal arts college). The wild variation seemed odd to me.

Work Study is applied inconsistently and amounts vary: The amount of Work Study availability varied from $1,200 to $2,500 for the same student with the same need levels. Furthermore, there were a number of NPCs that include Work Study as a resource used to reduce the cost to attend. This is an interesting technique because it, of course, lowers the cost to attend. But, Work Study earnings are seldom used to pay a student’s bill.

Some colleges offer very broad ranges: A small number of colleges offer ranges of need-based grants, rather than a specific level of grant support. I certainly understand this from an enrollment management perspective (you don’t want to promise something you can’t deliver), but the practice makes the NPCs almost useless, given the range offered can vary from $2,000 to $8,000.

The results are damn confusing: NPCs are anything but clear in presentation and results. In fact, they are terribly confusing even for someone who knows his way around this stuff. One college’s results were so crazy that we sent an anonymous email seeking clarification. The response we received directed us to yet a different calculator housed on the business office’s website. A further complication is that there is no easy way to find NPCs on most college websites—some are hidden deep within the structure and others are right up front. We ended up Googling Net Price Calculator + (college name) to make it easy. I hope that’s what families are doing.

If you’ve made it this far, you may want to know what we found out about Augustana and whether there are any general tends to which I can point?

With the help of the Office of Institutional Research and Assessment, and in an effort to try to compare apples to apples, rather than apples to basketballs, we “standardized” the results to determine net cost by looking at direct cost minus estimated grant aid and the Federal Stafford Loan. We left out PLUS, Work Study in order to try to assess how we stack up. Here’s what we found.

 

In short, here’s what was discovered:

 

 

Direct Cost

Student 1

Net Price

Student 2

Net Price

Student 3

Net Price

Student 4

Net Price

Mean

43,246

22,249

27,048

27,552

16,471

Median

43,161

20,784

25,944

27,119

15,060

Augustana

44,938

19, 338

24,638

24,638

13,438

Augie Difference from Median

1,777

-1,446

-1,306

-2,481

-1,622

 

Of the 16 schools we considered, Augustana’s direct cost is $1,692 above the mean and $1,777

above the median. However, after considering the scholarships and grants and $5,500 in

Stafford loans, Augustana is below both the mean and the median for each of the four students. 

Augie is more than $5,000 less than five other schools on the list for each student profile. 

The move from direct cost to net price is about a $3,500 jump for Augie.

 

 
 
 
 

Now I don’t know exactly what this means. My initial thought was; hey, that looks pretty good for us. I mean, our price is more than the mean, but our cost is less. And, in most cases, if we less expensive or perceived as a better value, I am perfectly comfortable making the case for the cost differential. However, I suspect the results are more nuanced.

Are we offering too much financial aid? Are we a better value? Do we make a more substantial investment in students?

I need to look deeper at all of these questions, but in the meantime, if you want to know how Augustana stacks up against these colleges for our archetype students, you will find the results below.

 

School

Student 1 – 75k CO

Student 1

Difference from Augie

Student 1

Augustana

19,338

24,838

 

Bradley

18,514

24,014

-824

DePaul#

30,392

35,892

11,054

Elmhurst

20,300

25,800

962

Gustavus Adolphus

20,885

26,385

1,547

Iowa

34,061

39,561

14,723

IWU

21,702

27,202

2,364

Loras

20,682

26,182

1,344

Loyola

29,130

34,630

9,792

Luther

21,847

27,347

2,509

Marquette

28,198

33,698

8,860

Monmouth

16,529

22,029

-2,809

NCC

15,869

21,369

-3,469

NIU

3,226

8,726

-16,112

Northwestern*

16,213

21,713

-3,125

U of I

39,105

44,605

19,767

 

School

Student 2 – 120k IL

Student 2

Difference from Augie Student 2

Augustana

24,638

30,138

 

Bradley

29,714

35,214

5,076

DePaul#

36,392

41,892

11,754

Elmhurst

23,900

29,400

-738

Gustavus Adolphus

28,894

34,394

4,256

Iowa

34,061

39,561

9,423

IWU

24,152

29,652

-486

Loras

24,132

29,632

-506

Loyola

31,250

36,750

6,612

Luther

25,695

31,195

1,057

Marquette

30,018

35,518

5,380

Monmouth

22,550

28,050

-2,088

NCC

21,069

26,569

-3,569

NIU

21,092

26,592

-3,546

Northwestern*

26,193

31,693

1,555

U of I

29,014

34,514

4,376

 

School

Student 3 – 200k IL

Student 3

Difference from Augie Student 3

Augustana

24,638

30,138

 

Bradley

24,514

30,014

-124

DePaul#

36,692

42,192

12,054

Elmhurst

25,600

31,100

962

Gustavus Adolphus

30,679

36,179

6,041

Iowa

34,601

40,101

9,963

IWU

29,102

34,602

4,464

Loras

24,882

30,382

244

Loyola

31,250

36,750

6,612

Luther

25,695

31,195

1,057

Marquette

31,018

36,518

6,380

Monmouth

22,550

28,050

-2,088

NCC

22,969

28,469

-1,669

NIU

19,092

24,592

-5,546

Northwestern*

28,543

34,043

3,905

U of I

29,014

34,514

4,376

 

School

Student 4  – 45k IL

Student 4

Difference from Augie Student 4

Augustana

13,438

18,938

 

Bradley

17,014

22,514

3,576

DePaul#

25,461

30,961

12,023

Elmhurst

9,510

15,010

-3,928

Gustavus Adolphus

13,648

19,148

210

Iowa

30,066

35,566

16,628

IWU

16,657

22,157

3,219

Loras

19,882

25,382

6,444

Loyola

23,235

28,735

9,797

Luther

15,167

20,667

1,729

Marquette

22,823

28,323

9,385

Monmouth

8,735

14,235

-4,703

NCC

13,854

19,354

416

NIU

14,953

20,453

1,515

Northwestern*

4,548

10,048

-8,890

U of I

14,538

20,038

1,100

 

 

*Archetype student unlikely to be admitted. This may be the case for other colleges in the comparison group, too.

#An average of the grant range provided by the NPC was used to come up with a grant value.

I am not sure that any of the results are earth-shattering, but they are interesting.

What do you think about all of this? Are you aware of other efforts to compare NPCs results?

If you are an enrollment professional, you might try this out on your own to see what a family might see at your institution and at your competition.

W. Kent Barnds a.k.a. @bowtieadmission

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W. Kent Barnds

W. Kent Barnds

Experienced Higher Education Professional and Complex Problem Solver

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